The Glorious Guiness Girls by Emily Hourican

Thank you to Antonia at Headline Books (who has now moved to work with The Felix Project) for a paperback copy of The Glorious Guiness Girls by Emily Hourican back in May – apologies for the delay in getting round to reading and reviewing it. I’m sharing a mini review today.

Synopsis:

The Glorious Guinness Girls are the toast of London and Dublin society. Darlings of the press, Aileen, Maureen and Oonagh lead charmed existences that are the envy of many. 

But Fliss knows better. Sent to live with them as a child, she grows up as part of the family and only she knows of the complex lives beneath the glamorous surface. 

Then, at a party one summer’s evening, something happens which sends shockwaves through the entire household. In the aftermath, as the Guinness sisters move on, Fliss is forced to examine her place in their world and decide if where she finds herself is where she truly belongs. 

My thoughts:

I spent last week reading three books all set in the 1920’s, all covering different characters and topics. In this book, I enjoyed finding out about how life for the Guinness Girls was different to other people in Ireland and in England.

Emily Hourican has created a set of fictional characters alongside the real life Guinness Girls and the Bright Young People of London. This book gives the reader a glimpse of a very different world to the world the majority of people experienced in this era.

I enjoyed this book, an excellent mix of history, family relationships, and finding your own identity. Fliss, the main fictional character, finds herself in a strange position, not part of the family but not one of the servants either.

A sequel is being published later this year, The Guinness Girls – A Hint of Scandal, and I look forward to reading more about Aileen, Maureen and Oonagh penned by Emily Hourican.

By Karen K is reading

An avid reader from the age of 4. Love escaping into a good novel after a busy day working with students. Mum of teenagers. Adopter of dogs.

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