Sisters of Berlin by Juliet Conlin @Julietconlin @bwpublishing @lovebooksgroup #lovebookstours

Today. I’m pleased to share my review for the Sisters of Berlin by Juliet Conlin. Thank you to Black and White Publishing for a digital review copy – my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the gift.

Synopsis:

Berlin 2014. The 25th anniversary of the fall of the Wall, and the city is gearing up for

a celebration of unity and liberation. But, beneath the surface, are those for whom the

divisions and allegiances of the past remain close to home.

In her hushed and leafy corner of Berlin, Nina’s life is a comfortable, conventional one

– until her younger sister Marie, a free-spirited writer, is attacked and left for dead.

For Nina, Marie’s brutal demise – and that of her unborn child – tips her own carefully

controlled life into a nightmare. Stonewalled by official incompetence and subterfuge,

Nina begins to realise that her sister’s past and the secrets of the once-divided city

are connected in unimaginable ways. As she seeks out justice for Marie, Nina becomes

caught in a tangle of obsessions, lies and hidden truths that threatens to destroy her

marriage, her livelihood and all that she holds dear.

My thoughts:

I remember the Berlin Wall falling – I had just started University and it seemed amazing that after all the recent worries about the USSR and the USA starting a nuclear war, that suddenly Communism was being swept away and the people of Berlin were now free to travel across their city.

This book is a murder mystery and historical fiction story rolled into one. Nina has recently lost her sister (murder), is struggling to keep her medical practice solvent and to look after her mental health (eating disorder).

This well written story looks at family relationships, the difficulties of being a working mum, dealing with grief and how the past can change the future. It is not an easy read due to the topics covered but was interesting and thought provoking. A stark reminder that no one knows what secrets people hold and what goes on behind closed doors.

Author bio:

Juliet Conlin was born in London and grew up in England and Germany. She has an MA in Creative Writing from Lancaster University and a PhD in Psychology from the University of Durham. She works as a writer and translator and lives with her family in Berlin. Her novels include The Fractured Man (Cargo, 2013), The Uncommon Life of Alfred Warner in Six Days (Black & White, 2017), The Lives Before Us (Black & White, 2019).

Buy Link

http://blackandwhitepublishing.com/shop.html

Publisher

Black & White Publishing was founded in 1999 by Managing Director Campbell Brown and Publishing Director Alison McBride. Since then, the business has grown into one of Scotland’s leading independent publishers with over 300 books in print across a variety of genres. Committed to publishing the best books from the most talented writers in the UK and beyond, some of our bestselling authors include Daniela Sacerdoti,  James Robertson,  Estelle Maskame,  Nick Alexander,  Richard Gordon,  Alex Norton,  Millie Gray,  Sally Magnusson and Tony Black.  We produce an extensive range of titles, including general non-fiction,  biography,  sport and humour,  as well as selected fiction,  young adult and children’s books.

This year, we’ve started an exciting new alliance with PGUK who now provide sales representation for our titles, and GBS continues to distribute our books. Our eBooks are distributed by Faber Factory. Over recent years, our range of fiction has grown following recent eBook successes such as Daniela Sacerdoti’s Glen Avich series, which has sold nearly a million copies to date. These new alliances and our e-book successes are helping us shape and develop the list in new ways to bring more exciting new titles to both local and global markets.

the Eliza Doll by Tracey Scott – Townsend @Wildpressed @lovebooksgroup #lovebookstours

I’m pleased to share my review for the Eliza Doll by a new author to me, Tracey Scott-Townsend being republished by Wild Pressed Books this summer. Thank you to the publisher for a paperback copy and to Love Books Group for inviting me to join the book tour.

Synopsis:

Ellie can’t work out whether she’s running away from the past or towards a future she always felt she should have had. She left university and had baby after baby without even meaning to. But it was her third child she blamed for ruining her life.

Now her children have grown and Ellie is on her own. She shocks everybody by selling her home and moving into a converted van to travel the country selling handmade dolls at craft fairs.

It can be lonely on the road. Ellie has two companions: her dog, Jack, and the mysterious
Eliza who turns up in the most unexpected places. At every encounter with Eliza, Ellie feels as if she’s standing again in the aching cold of a waterfall in Iceland, the sound of crashing water filling her with dread.

Ellie can’t change the past. But is it really too late to rectify the bad thing she did when Eliza was a baby?

My thoughts:

This is the first book I’ve read by Tracey Scott-Townsend and it is being republished four years on from the original publication date.

We meet Ellie as she turns 50, hiding away from her family and friends, living in a converted van with Jack, her dog. The story travels back and forwards in time as we discover what happened to Ellie to cause her to travel the country in her van, selling handmade dolls at craft fairs and why she doesn’t want to sell the Eliza doll. We also travel to Iceland and Ireland, as Ellie looks for peace and forgiveness.

This was an interesting and thought provoking read, covering some difficult topics including child abuse. My favourite part of the book is when Ellie first joins Running Hare House and starts to work with the local community. A 4 star read for me.

Author bio:

Tracey-Scott-Townsend is the author of six novels — the most recent The Vagabond Mother (January 2020) and Sea Babies (May 2019) — all published by Wild Pressed Books and Inspired Quill Publishing. Reviews often describe her novels as poetic or painterly.

She is also a poet and a visual artist. She has a Fine Art MA and a BA (Hons) Visual Studies. She has exhibited paintings throughout the UK (as Tracey Scott). She has a long career as a workshop facilitator with community groups and in schools.

Tracey is co-director of an up-and-coming small independent publisher, Wild Pressed Books, which has a growing roster of authors and poets.

Mother of four grown-up children, Tracey spends as much time as possible travelling the UK and Europe in a camper van with her husband and two dogs, writing and editing while on the road. 

Buy Link 

http://www.wildpressedbooks.com/the-eliza-doll.html

The Saturday Morning Park Run by Jules Wake #blogtour





I’m pleased to share my review for the latest book by Jules Wake. Thank you to One More Chapter for a digital review copy to prepare for the blog tour with Rachel’s Random Resources – my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the free digital copy. The book will be published later this month but can be pre-ordered now.

Synopsis:

This is the story of two women.
One old, one young.
One looking for new adventures. One looking for a purpose.
Both needing a friend.
And this is how, along with two little girls in need of a family, a gorgeous stranger, and a scruffy dog, they bring the whole community together every Saturday morning for love, laughter and a little bit of running…(well, power walking).
Some people come into your life when you need them the most.

My thoughts:

I enjoyed this story, which seems even more relevant now after lockdown, looking at how there are lonely people all around and people are starting to reconsider their work/life balance alongside their physical and mental health.

I was thrilled to be able to read this book because I recently enjoyed The Little Teashop in Tokyo by Julie Caplin (see my review at https://mentoringmumof2bookreviews.home.blog/2020/06/03/the-little-teashop-in-tokyo-by-julie-caplin/ ), then discovered Jules Wake is her real name – thank you to TheBookBabe for recommending her books. I was also keen to read about the Park Run – my family have been involved with running and volunteering at our local Park Run over the past few years.

The story takes some time to get to the Park Run, but please do keep reading as Jules Wake introduces you to a great cast of characters and a dog (all the best books have a dog). My favourite character was Hilda, who is determined to enjoy life and to encourage others to do the same.

This is a book about friendship and trust, community spirit and improving our mental health with exercise. An uplifting read for 2020.

Pre-order Links:

Jules Wake:

Jules Wake announced at the age of ten that she planned to be a writer. Along the way she was diverted by the glamorous world of PR and worked on many luxury brands and not so luxury brands. This proved fabulous training for writing novels as it provided her with the opportunity to hone her writing and creative skills penning copy on a vast range of subjects from pig farming and watches, sunglasses and skincare through to beer and stationery.  

She writes best-selling warm-hearted contemporary fiction for One More Chapter as Jules Wake and under her pen name Julie Caplin, she writes the Romantic Escapes series.  

Between them, the two Js have written fourteen novels, The Saturday Morning Park Run being the latest. 

Social Media Links – 

Twitter @Juleswake

https://www.facebook.com/juleswakewrites/

Instagram: juleswakeauthor

Please check out the other reviews on the blog tour – information below.

Come Join the Murder by Holly Rae Garcia

I’m pleased to share my review for this tense thriller by Holly Rae Garcia today on my book blog. Thank you to Blackthorn Book Tours for inviting me to join the tour (my first with Blackthorn) and providing a digital review copy – my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the gift.

Synopsis:

Rebecca Crow’s four-year-old son is dead and her husband is missing.

Divers find her husband’s car at the bottom of a canal with their son’s small, lifeless body, inside. The police have no suspects and nothing to go on but a passing mention of a man driving a van. Guilt and grief cloud Rebecca’s thoughts as she stumbles toward her only mission: Revenge.

James Porter knows exactly what happened to them, but he’ll do anything to keep it a secret.

James didn’t plan to kill Rebecca’s son, but he’s not too broken up about it, either. There are more important things for him to worry about. He needs money, and his increasing appetite for murder is catching the attention of a nosy detective.

My thoughts:

This was an unusual book for me because we met the murderer at the beginning of the book, no trying to work out ‘who did it’ in this story. Instead this is a story about how the grief of the murder of her only child drives Rebecca to seek the ultimate revenge.

This is well written and all too believable. A mother racked with guilt and grief looking for the thief / killer who enjoys the thrill of the kill, especially when he keeps getting away with it. It was difficult not to feel sympathy for Rebecca, even as the story unfolded, as her desire for revenge lead her to become the hunter. It is difficult to say any more without giving any spoilers.

I raced through the story, and didn’t want to put it down – the sign of an excellent story. I’m looking forward to reading future novels by Holly Rae Garcia and will be recommending this book.

Holly Rae Garcia:

Holly Rae Garcia’s debut novel, Come Join the Murder, was released on March 27th, 2020 by Close to the Bone Publishing (UK). Her short fiction has been published by Siren’s Call, The Bookends Review, Rue Scribe, Pen to Print, The Australian Writers’ Centre, and Trembling With Fear along with a few anthologies. Holly lives on the Texas Coast with her family and five dogs.

Links 

     My Website: https://www.hollyraegarcia.com/

     Book’s Amazon Page: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B084FHXZZL

     Book’s Goodreads Page: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/50978801-come-join-the-murder

     Twitter: @HollyRaeGarcia

     Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HollyRaeGarciaAuthor/?modal=admin_todo_tour

     Instagram: @HollyRaeGarcia

The Village Shop for Lonely Hearts by Alison Sherlock #blogtour

I’m thrilled to share my review for this uplifting new book by Alison Sherlock on my book review blog today. Thank you to Boldwood Books and Rachel’s Random Resources for the digital proof copy – my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the gift.

Synopsis:

After losing her job in New York, Amber Green isn’t looking forward to visiting her godmother in the sleepy village of Cranbridge. With its empty lanes and rundown shops, it’s hardly a place to mend her lonely heart.

But when Amber discovers that Cranbridge Stores, owned by her godmother Cathy and son Josh, is under threat of financial ruin, she realises that her skills as a window dresser might just be able to help save the struggling shop.

When disaster strikes, Amber and Josh must unite to save both the shop and the village from flooding.

Can Cranbridge Stores become the heart of the village once more?

And as the village begins to come back to life, perhaps Amber will discover a reason to stay…

My thoughts:

This is the first book I’ve read by Alison Sherlock and it won’t be the last. This is a book about finding the right place to be, which may not be the one you originally planned.

I live near to the Cotswolds, where the book is set and this book was a lovely escape from the current anxious world that we live in. Amber and Josh are both looking at their lives to see why their intended career paths have changed so much. As they work together to modernise the shop and to help out the local community during a flood, they start to discover that they may have more in common than they expected.

This was an uplifting read during the global pandemic – a book to curl up with for a ‘virtual hug’. I enjoyed the community spirit of the book and the gentle humour of the characters. I hope we will be able to visit Cranbridge again in future books.

Alison Sherlock:

Alison Sherlock is the author of the bestselling Willow Tree Hall books. Alison enjoyed reading and writing stories from an early age and gave up office life to follow her dream. Her new series for Boldwood is set in a fictional Cotswold Village and the first title will be published in July 2020.

Social Media Links – 

Twitter https://twitter.com/AlisonSherlock

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/alison.sherlock.73

Bookbub https://www.bookbub.com/authors/alison-sherlock

Purchase Links – https://amzn.to/2VPGfzh

The curious case of maggie macbeth by Stacey Murray

I’m bursting with excitement to share my review as part of the blog tour for this debut novel by Stacey Murray today. Thanks to Lizzie Lewis at RedDoor Press for a copy of the book, my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the free gift or by the fact there is a dog on the book cover.

Synopsis:

Sometimes you have to take the law into your own hands…


After unexpectedly losing her high-powered job in Hong Kong, forty-something widow, Maggie Macbeth, turns up on the doorstep of her old sidekick, Cath, in the sleepy Peak District village of Archdale.

A fish out of water, Maggie comes into conflict with everyone and everything — especially Cath’s awful friend Tiggy – and rock bottom is just around the corner. But it turns out Maggie isn’t the only one in trouble, and when a crisis hits the local community, Maggie has a choice: to give up on life, or to go back to her legal roots and fight for justice. But can she save the day as well as herself?

My thoughts:

Having grown up in South Yorkshire and visited the Peak District on many occasions, I enjoyed my virtual visit to the virtual village of Archdale during the early summer of 2020 to meet Maggie, Cath and so many more wonderful characters created by Stacey Murray.

As the blurb on the back of the book points out, Maggie has left her high powered job in Hong Kong and is now staying with an old friend in a sleepy village in England. Initially it was difficult to warm to Maggie, who seemed to be overstaying her welcome at Cath’s and was reluctant to be helpful.

However as the story progressed, we discovered more about Maggie, the heartbreak she had suffered and how she needed time to rediscover herself. Then it was time for Maggie to help her friend Cath, plus many of the new people she had met in Archdale.

The book covers a lot of topics, some of them heartbreaking, as we discover what has happened in the past for Maggie, Cath and Rob. However, the book looks at how they all move forward with help of the local community.

I loved the humour, especially when Maggie spends time with Tiggy. Another excellent addition to the story is Jazz – all the best books include at least one dog. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this story about friendship and love, and will be recommending it to friends and family.

Stacey Murray:

A native of Glasgow, Stacey Murray was an international commercial lawyer for many years – in the City of London and in Hong Kong. In 2005, she changed career to become an independent film producer. Her first film, A Boy Called Dad, was acquired by the BBC and nominated for the Michael Powell Award for Best British Film at the Edinburgh International Film Festival. She lives in hope – literally, in the village of Hope in the Derbyshire Peak District – with her husband and two rescue dogs. Twitter is her social media drug of choice: her handle is @TheStacemeister.

The Ringmaster’s Daughter by Carly Schabowski

I’m thrilled to be sharing my review for the Ringmaster’s Daughter by Carly Schabowski on my book review blog today – this thought provoking book is now one of my favourite book of 2020. Thank you to Bookouture for a digital review copy via NetGalley and for inviting me to join the blog tour. My thoughts about the book are my own and not influenced by the free copy (or by the author’s dogs – we also have a King Charles Cavalier Spaniel)

Synopsis:

Circus people don’t ask who you were before, or what god you believe in… when you join the circus, you are family, whatever your past.

Paris, 1940. Twenty-year-old Michel Bonnet lives on the edge of the law, finding work where he can breaking in horses on the outskirts of the city. But when the Nazis invade, Michel takes refuge as a stowaway on a rickety train bound for the rural south. It’s a journey that will change his life forever.

The train is property of Le Cirque Neumann – a travelling circus owned by the troubled and irritable showman Werner Neumann. Neumann offers Michel a job caring for the company’s horses – a lucky break, but with an unusual condition attached. Michel must keep to himself and never speak of what he sees behind the glittering curtain of the big top.

But as Michel finds himself pulled into the strange and wondrous world of the great spectacular it becomes more difficult to keep his promise. Why does the man with the performing monkey never speak, and the sword swallower turn his face away? Who are the silent, shadowy figures who flit like moths between the wagons when the sun is down? It’s clear that Neumann is keeping his performers hidden away… but why?

And how can Michel win the love of the beautiful and exotic trapeze artist Freida – the graceful, green-eyed star of Neuman’s spectacular – when he’s been forbidden to even meet her gaze?

A heartbreaking and uplifting wartime novel– perfect for fans of Water for ElephantsThe Nightingale and The Tattooist of Auschwitz.

My thoughts:

In May 2020, during the early days of furlough, I saw this book listed on NetGalley. Both the cover image and the synopsis appealed – I enjoy ‘modern’ historical fiction having studied the twentieth century during my O level course.

The book starts in Paris, just as the Germans are marching in, in the summer of 1940 and the British are heading home via Dunkirk. Carly Schabowski sets the scene of a city in turmoil, with neighbours running away and bomb damage being repaired. We are introduced to Michel, a shy young man, who is the main character. It was only after reading the book, that I realised that this is one of very few books I’ve read recently where the main character is male and is the first male historical fiction main character (the other books were of crime or thriller genres).

Michel escapes Paris (with help from his neighbour Betrand), and ends up travelling with the Le Cirque Neumann, looking after their horses. As the synopsis states, Werner, the Ringmaster keeps his performers away from Michel. The book follows Michel as he slowly becomes trusted by Werner and we discover the history of the various performers.

This wasn’t a book about a circus for me, but a book about how dangerous it was to be living in France in 1940 if you were Jewish, Catholic, disabled, gay or had a rare genetic condition. The circus performers all had reasons to hide and heartbreaking stories to share – including the one who made himself mute so that he couldn’t tell anyone where his family had fled to.

I was entranced by the story telling and could see this book as a movie. The detailed descriptions brought the locations and the show in the Big Top to life. I realised how much I had been encouraged to care for the characters when we reached the end of the book and I was holding my breath to find out what happened next. There are many friendships and romances to discover amongst the heartbreak and betrayals.

This is a beautifully written historical fiction book, dealing with some difficult topics and sadly even in our modern times, some of the same intolerances still exist. As I said earlier in my review, this is one of my favourite books of 2020 and I will be busy recommending it.

Carly Schabowski

Carly Schabowski worked as a journalist in both North Cyprus and Australia before returning to Oxford, where she studied for an MA and then a PhD in creative writing at Oxford Brookes University. Carly now teaches at Oxford Brookes University as an associate lecturer in Creative Writing for first and second-year English literature students. 
Twitter:  @carlyschab11

Buy Links:
Amazon: https://bit.ly/3eMifEf

Apple: https://apple.co/34mzW9h

Kobo: https://bit.ly/2RmjnoF

Google: https://bit.ly/38oTs77

A Sunset in Sydney by Sandy Barker #blogtour #nospoilers

I’m thrilled to share my review for the latest book by Sandy Barker on my book review blog today. Thank you to One More Chapter and Rachel’s Random Resources for a digital review copy via NetGalley – my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the gift.

Synopsis:

How far would you go in the name of love?

Sarah Parsons has a choice ahead of her. After the trip of a lifetime she’s somehow returned home with TWO handsome men wanting to whisk her away into the sunset.

Pulled in two directions across the globe, it’s making life trickier than it sounds. Her gorgeous American, Josh, wants to meet Sarah in Hawaii for a holiday to remember. Meanwhile silver fox, James, plans to wine and dine her in London.

It’s a lot to handle for this Aussie girl, who had totally sworn off men!

Join Sarah after her adventure in One Summer in Santorini, for the heart-warming and uplifting third novel in The Holiday Romance series.

My thoughts:

After enjoying reading One Summer in Santorini last year, I was thrilled to hear that we continue following Sarah’s story after leaving Greece.

If you haven’t read One Summer in Santorini, Australian Sarah decided to remain single after a painful break up, then met a young American Josh and an older Brit James (aka Silver Fox) whilst visiting Greece. This story follows Sarah in the months after Santorini – will she rediscover her mojo for teaching and will she find a special someone to share her life with?

I enjoyed this book even more than One Summer in Santorini, especially the trip to Hawaii. It was great to see how Sarah’s trip to Greece changed her outlook on life and how she discovered what was important to make her happy. There is a great cast of characters again and lovely locations (London, Australia, Hawaii, New Zealand), and I especially loved the ending. This is a lovely summer time read full of virtual visits to foreign countries. Please check out the other blog tour reviews this week too.

Purchase Links 

AmazonUK: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sunset-Sydney-totally-uplifting-holiday-ebook/dp/B081MSC5S3

Google play: https://bit.ly/3dLjJxU

Waterstones: https://www.waterstones.com/book/a-sunset-in-sydney/sandy-barker/9780008390020

Kobo: https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/a-sunset-in-sydney-the-holiday-romance-book-3

Author Bio – 

Sandy Barker is an Australian writer, traveller and hopeful romantic with a lengthy bucket list and a cheeky sense of humour. She’s also an avid reader, a film buff, a wine lover and a coffee snob.
Many of Sandy’s travel adventures have found homes in her writing, including her debut novel, a contemporary romance set in Greece, which was inspired by her true-life love story.

Social Media Links – 

Twitterhttps://twitter.com/sandybarker

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sandybarkerauthor/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sandybarkerauthor/

Blog: https://sandybarker.com/

Summertime at the Cornish Confetti Agency by Daisy James #blogtour

I’m thrilled to share my review for this gorgeous summertime read by Daisy James, a new author to me. Thank you to Rachel’s Random Resources for a digital proof copy so that I can read and review for the upcoming blog tour. My thoughts are my own and not influenced by the gift.

Synopsis:

It’s Summertime at The Cornish Confetti Agency!

When Lexie Harrington is asked to co-ordinate Kat and Dylan’s ‘English village fête’ wedding, she’s determined that this time everything will go according to her carefully laid plans; no ice bucket challenges, no whoopee cushions, and absolutely no googly eyes attached to everything in sight!

With gorgeous journalist-cum-wedding columnist Theo Barker to offer a helping hand, Lexie is optimistic that she can deliver the fairy tale wedding her clients have always dreamed of…. until the best man Noah is targeted by a loose hosepipe, the wedding rings go walk-about, and his beloved scarlet Porsche takes on a distinctly unpleasant aroma.

Can Lexie and Theo uncover what’s behind the mysterious goings on, or will the Cornish Confetti Agency be forced to close its doors to the future brides and grooms of glorious Cornwall.

My thoughts:

I hadn’t realised that this was the second book in a new series, the first was published in March 2020. However I quickly picked up on the events from The Cornish Confetti Agency and the blossoming friendship for Lexie and Theo.

I’ve still not visited Cornwall in person, but Daisy James brought the area to life for me. The book is set during the week of the wedding of Kat and Dylan, a very busy week for temporary wedding planner Lexie.

I loved the story – just what we need in the middle of a global pandemic to make us smile. Great characters, although some were more loveable than others, a gorgeous setting and a lovely theme for the wedding.

The story was uplifting in many ways and I loved the extreme ironing competition discussion. There are secrets to discover, mysteries to solve, new friendships to make, old issues to resolve and a wedding to prepare.

A book to enjoy with a glass of Pimm’s or with a cocktail during the summer months. I’m already looking forward to the next book – Christmas at the Cornish Confetti Agency.

Daisy James:

Daisy James loves writing stories with strong heroines and swift-flowing plotlines. She especially likes to create sunshine-filled settings in exotic locations – the Caribbean, Tuscany, Cornwall, Provence – so she can spend her time envisioning her characters enjoying the fabulous scenery and sampling the local food and drink.

When not scribbling away in her peppermint-and-green summerhouse (garden shed), she spends her time sifting flour and sprinkling sugar and edible glitter. She loves gossiping with friends over a glass of something fizzy or indulging in a spot of afternoon tea – china plates and teacups are a must.

Purchase Links 

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B086VLBSPJ

US – https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B086VLBSPJ

Social Media Links – 

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100009889775019

Twitter @daisyjamesbooks

Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/daisyjamesstories/

The English Wife by Adrienne Chinn #blogtour

I’m thrilled to share my thoughts about this time slip historical novel on my book review blog today. Thank you to One More Chapter and Rachel’s Random Resources for a digital review copy via NetGalley – my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the gift.

Synopsis:

Two women, a world apart.

A secret waiting to be discovered…

VE Day 1945: As victory bells ring out across the country, war bride Ellie Burgess’ happiness is overshadowed by grief. Her charismatic Newfoundlander husband Thomas is still missing in action.
 
Until a letter arrives explaining Thomas is back at home on the other side of the Atlantic recovering from his injuries.

Travelling to a distant country to live with a man she barely knows is the bravest thing Ellie has ever had to do. But nothing can prepare her for the harsh realities of her new home…

September 11th 2001: Sophie Parry is on a plane to New York on the most tragic day in the city’s history. While the world watches the news in horror, Sophie’s flight is rerouted to a tiny town in Newfoundland and she is forced to seek refuge with her estranged aunt Ellie.
 
Determined to discover what it was that forced her family apart all those years ago, newfound secrets may change her life forever…
 
This is a timeless story of love, sacrifice and resilience perfect for fans of Lorna Cook and Gill Paul.

My thoughts:

This is the first historical fiction novel I’ve read involving Newfoundland – I must admit that I had to look up Newfoundland to check exactly where it is. If you read some of the other blog tour posts for The English Wife, you can read about the author growing up in the area.

This book involves two distinct time periods – we follow Ellie through the war years in the UK, then her early years in Newfoundland. We also meet her again when her niece Sophie has an unexpected visit to Newfoundland in September 2001, returning again in 2011. This is not a ‘light read’ due to the time periods it is set in (war and terrorist attacks) and needing to move between the different time periods. However it is a well written and thought provoking book, looking at how the events of the 1940’s impacts on the life of Sophie.

I enjoyed travelling to the different time periods, each with their own challenges for the characters of this story. There is romance, love, loss, hardship, new friendships, in-laws, mystery and lots of secrets. My favourite time period was 2001 when Sophie met her aunt and other family members for the first time.

Purchase Links 

https://amzn.to/2KpCBpb

https://amzn.to/3bqYKPZ

https://amzn.to/2VpSoLk

Adrienne Chinn:

Adrienne Chinn was born in Grand Falls, Newfoundland, grew up in Quebec, and eventually made her way to London, England after a career as a journalist. In England she worked as a TV and film researcher before embarking on a career as an interior designer, lecturer, and writer. When not up a ladder or at the computer, she can usually be found rummaging through flea markets or haggling in the Marrakech souk. Her second novel, The English Wife — a timeslip story set in World War II England and contemporary Newfoundland — is published in June 2020. Her debut novel, The Lost Letter from Morocco, was published by Avon Books UK in 2019. She is currently writing her third novel, The Photographer’s Daughters, the first of a 3-book series, to be published in 2021.

Social Media Links – 

https://www.facebook.com/adriennechinnauthor/?modal=admin_todo_tour

https://www.instagram.com/adriennechinn/?hl=en