Nothin’ But A Good Time by Justin Quirk – Extract from the book.

Today I’m sharing an extract from this fascinating new book. Thank you to Unbound for a copy of the paperback in return for an honest review – my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the gift. Thank you to Anne of Random Things Tours for inviting me to join the blog tour. I will also be sharing an extract from the book later today.

Thank you to Justin Quirk for supplying a Spotify playlist to listen to alongside the book at https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3JG9tQCecG2iA25DD5Seax?si=PgT_eDGQSye1ZKEDiRzSSw. I’m listening to it whilst writing my review.

Synopsis:

From 1983 until 1991, Glam Metal was the sound of American culture. Big hair, massive amplifiers, drugs, alcohol, piles of money and life-threatening pyrotechnics. This was the world stalked by Bon Jovi, Kiss, W.A.S.P., Skid Row, Dokken, Motley Crue, Cinderella, Ratt and many more. Armed with hairspray, spandex and strangely shaped guitars, they marked the last great era of supersize bands.

Where did Glam Metal come from? How did it spread? What killed it off? And why does nobody admit to having been a Glam Metaller anymore?

Extract:

In the last week of August 2014, a Californian musician uploaded a six-minute long video to Youtube, showing himself taking part in the Ice Bucket Challenge – not so unusual in itself, with 2.4million-and-counting of these charitable enterprises online around that time. However, this Ice Bucket Challenge was different: firstly, the man had bags of ice balanced on his head and in his crotch rather than being poured over him; secondly, rather than passing the challenge on to his friends and family, he called out (‘while my jewels freeze’) three of his high profile colleagues – Eddie Van Halen, David Lee Roth and John Meyer; and finally, he communicated each word of his speech in blinks, painstakingly spelling out one letter at a time via an interpreter, while he sat motionless in a wheelchair.

Once touted as potentially the best metal guitarist on earth, 45-year-old Jason Becker has spent the best part of the last 18 years completely paralysed, since being diagnosed with ALS when he was on the verge of rock megastardom. But in that time he has not only defied medical wisdom by staying healthy and alive, he has also continued to compose and create his own astonishing music, been the subject of an award-winning documentary and helped to invent a communication system which has revolutionised the lives of other patients like him worldwide.

Despite being confined to a chair and unable to physicall perform, his public existence largely limited to a Twitter profile and sporadic musical releases, his influence continues: in 2012, Guitar Player magazine named him as ‘the greatest shredder ever’; in 2014, Seymour Duncan released his signature model pickup with Carvin following up with a signature line of guitars in 2015. And both fundraising gigs and a documentary about Becker’s life have taken place under a title you could only hope to find in the blackly comic world of heavy metal: Jason Becker: Not Dead Yet.

Since 1995, Jason Becker has released four albums. Not exactly a punishing workrate for a regular artist, but Becker’s life, composing and recording techniques are very far from normal. Since ALS paralysed his body, he has continued to create music, moving away from the pyrotechnic, lightning-fast metal of his youth to more textured, complicated pieces, often instrumental, sometimes with layered, treated voices giving the work an ethereal, hypnotic feel. 

In the last week of August 2014, a Californian musician uploaded a six-minute long video to Youtube, showing himself taking part in the Ice Bucket Challenge – not so unusual in itself, with 2.4million-and-counting of these charitable enterprises online around that time. However, this Ice Bucket Challenge was different: firstly, the man had bags of ice balanced on his head and in his crotch rather than being poured over him; secondly, rather than passing the challenge on to his friends and family, he called out (‘while my jewels freeze’) three of his high profile colleagues – Eddie Van Halen, David Lee Roth and John Meyer; and finally, he communicated each word of his speech in blinks, painstakingly spelling out one letter at a time via an interpreter, while he sat motionless in a wheelchair.

Once touted as potentially the best metal guitarist on earth, 45-year-old Jason Becker has spent the best part of the last 18 years completely paralysed, since being diagnosed with ALS when he was on the verge of rock megastardom. But in that time he has not only defied medical wisdom by staying healthy and alive, he has also continued to compose and create his own astonishing music, been the subject of an award-winning documentary and helped to invent a communication system which has revolutionised the lives of other patients like him worldwide.

Despite being confined to a chair and unable to physicall perform, his public existence largely limited to a Twitter profile and sporadic musical releases, his influence continues: in 2012, Guitar Player magazine named him as ‘the greatest shredder ever’; in 2014, Seymour Duncan released his signature model pickup with Carvin following up with a signature line of guitars in 2015. And both fundraising gigs and a documentary about Becker’s life have taken place under a title you could only hope to find in the blackly comic world of heavy metal: Jason Becker: Not Dead Yet.

Since 1995, Jason Becker has released four albums. Not exactly a punishing workrate for a regular artist, but Becker’s life, composing and recording techniques are very far from normal. Since ALS paralysed his body, he has continued to create music, moving away from the pyrotechnic, lightning-fast metal of his youth to more textured, complicated pieces, often instrumental, sometimes with layered, treated voices giving the work an ethereal, hypnotic feel. 

Soon after Becker’s paralysis, his friend Mike Bemesderfer devised a software programme connected to a visor-mounted sensor. Becker could click a virtual keyboard by moving his chin, altering the velocity of each note and gradually, painstakingly assembling them into entire pieces of music. His album Perspective was the result of this exhausting process, with his epic ten-minute composition, End of The Beginning going on to be performed by the Oakland Symphony Orchestra and the Diablo Ballet in 1999. On its release, Eddie Van Halen appeared on video with the immobilised Becker to describe him as having been ‘just one of the best rock and roll guitarists on the planet.’ The understandable sense among viewers was that in Becker they were watching a man who was living on borrowed time.

To view the other reviews on the blog tour this week, check out the following blogs:

Author Bio:

Justin Quirk is a writer and editor based in London. Since starting his career at the Guardian, he has written for titles including i-DDazed and Confused,Kerrang!QWord, the IndependentThe Sunday TimesArena and Esquire. He has also worked as a curator, DJ and creative director and regularly appears on the BBC World Service discussing culture and current affairs. He lives in London.

PAPERBACK

978-1-78965-135-5
320 pages
198 × 129 mm
3 September 2020 £10.99 / $14.99 / €11.66

EBOOK

978-1-78965-136-2 ePub
3 September 2020 £5.99 / $7.99 / €6.66

Nothin’ But A Good Time by Justin Quirk

Today I’m sharing my review for this fascinating new book, looking at the emergence and then rapid decline of Glam Metal. Thank you to Unbound for a copy of the paperback in return for an honest review – my thoughts are my own and not influenced by the gift. Thank you to Anne of Random Things Tours for inviting me to join the blog tour. I will also be sharing an extract from the book later today.

Thank you to Justin Quirk for supplying a Spotify playlist to listen to alongside the book at https://open.spotify.com/playlist/3JG9tQCecG2iA25DD5Seax?si=PgT_eDGQSye1ZKEDiRzSSw. I’m listening to it whilst writing my review.

Synopsis:

From 1983 until 1991, Glam Metal was the sound of American culture. Big hair, massive amplifiers, drugs, alcohol, piles of money and life-threatening pyrotechnics. This was the world stalked by Bon Jovi, Kiss, W.A.S.P., Skid Row, Dokken, Motley Crue, Cinderella, Ratt and many more. Armed with hairspray, spandex and strangely shaped guitars, they marked the last great era of supersize bands.

Where did Glam Metal come from? How did it spread? What killed it off? And why does nobody admit to having been a Glam Metaller anymore?

My thoughts:

I must admit that I don’t remember the rise of Glam Metal – in 1983 I was too busy listening to Duran Duran, Spandau Ballet and Human League. However by the late Eighties my tastes in music had expanded, as friends recommended bands and albums, and I enjoyed listening to the Hysteria album by local band Def Leppard.

This book was a fascinating read – full of statistical information but also lots of ‘human interest’ stories – the highs and lows of the bands, the personalities and the problems they faced. The story is told in chronological date order and includes many quotes from the bands during the era (or more recently).

I must admit that I hadn’t heard of some of the bands, but the majority were familiar. The Spotify playlist is helping me find out more about the earlier tracks and bands, and to enjoy the music of the late Eighties again.

A must read book for anyone who enjoyed listening to this genre of music – maybe to be given for Christmas 2020 with a can of extra strong hairspray, spandex and a denim jacket. The only thing missing from the book, in my humble opinion, was some photographs of the bands so that younger readers could appreciate the ‘look’.

To view the other reviews on the blog tour this week, check out the following blogs:

Author Bio:

Justin Quirk is a writer and editor based in London. Since starting his career at the Guardian, he has written for titles including i-DDazed and Confused,Kerrang!QWord, the IndependentThe Sunday TimesArena and Esquire. He has also worked as a curator, DJ and creative director and regularly appears on the BBC World Service discussing culture and current affairs. He lives in London.

PAPERBACK

978-1-78965-135-5
320 pages
198 × 129 mm
3 September 2020 £10.99 / $14.99 / €11.66

EBOOK

978-1-78965-136-2 ePub
3 September 2020 £5.99 / $7.99 / €6.66